Helping People Exercise Their Lawful Rights

Law can be a rather tricky field, to say the least. Anyone involved with the field is well aware of just how intricate it can be. It turns out that human language can be remarkably vague and open for differing interpretations. One needs to be able to sort out quite a bit of information from often ambiguous sources in order to work within the legal system. In fact, part of the field is translating legal nomenclature to something the average person can more easily understand. Most people entering into the legal field are well aware of that fact. What’s often more surprising is how often people don’t even exercise the rights they’re entitled to under the law. Rhode Island joins a growing number of states who are trying to help people recognize what they’re entitled to under the law. The first and arguably most important measure is helping people vote.

There’s quite a few reason for states joining this initiative. One of the most important is that it might help encourage people to vote. People often come into the process with the idea that voting for things related to the law will be as complicated as practicing law. Once they actually take part in the process they usually see that this is the true beauty of representational systems of government. The actual participation in the system doesn’t have any real prerequisites other than citizenship. Or at least that’s the case in states which use automatic voter registration to cut through red tape.

It’s also notable that the measure passed with bipartisan support. No matter what political party one agrees with, it’s clear that everyone should have a voice in how they function. By helping people vote the government will be better able to represent everyone’s needs. Because in the end that’s what law is within democratic societies. Law is the process by which a society governs itself. However, that’s only true if the people within a society are actually participating in the process.